Why Are We Failing To Fund Mental Health Research?

Insightful post on the reasons of mental health underfunding.

Snackable Science

Everyone is affected by mental illness in some capacity, either directly or through those that we know. Around a quarter of the population experience a mental health condition each year and this high prevalence has considerable repercussions, both socially and economically. Indeed, many would be surprised to hear that on top of obvious human suffering, mental illness is estimated to cost the UK an eye-watering £105 billion a year once healthcare expenses and lost productivity have been taken into account.

With mental illness disrupting the lives of so many and harming the economy to such an extent, I was genuinely surprised to hear of the funding gap that exists in mental health research. Compared to other diseases that place a similar burden on society, publicly funded research into mental health is disproportionately low. Cancer research provides some of the strongest evidence of this effect, receiving around 20% of total UK research expenditure, almost four times more than the amount invested…

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With Big Data & Digital Health – New Collaborations are Emerging in the Pharma Industry – PWC

TeamWork

A newly published report by PWC reveals novel collaboration models for improved value of medicines

“Driven by empowered consumers and connected technology, the New Health Economy is shifting business incentives from volume to value with a focus on health outcomes beyond the clinic.”

Big data together with EHR (electronic health records) and wearables drive patient empowerment. Today, more and more, people have their say in treatment choices. Actually, health benefits and prices are crucial criteria for decision, especially as patients face today higher out-of-pocket expenses than ever before. We all well know that expensive treatments are financially disastrous for patients as mentioned in one of my previous posts.

Currently, increased focus is put on drug cost effectiveness as we switch progressively from a fee-for-service to an outcome-based world. Every treatment should be precisely calculated in order to be sure that it is optimized for all stakeholders from all points of view. In this context, already last year, PWC highlighted the beginning of a new system: the New Health Economy, where outcomes and quality are rewarded (instead of volume). It is the continuum of what has been started by Michael E. Porter several years ago.

All these changes have essential meanings. Therefore business models need to adapt to current trends: digital is unavoidable; purchaser perspective is necessary; patients need to become partners; regulatory changes have to be anticipated.

Adapting business models is fantastic but not sufficient. Novel collaborations are needed to optimize them for long-term success. All the stakeholders have to be integrated and blended by the biopharma companies: government agencies, insurers (payers as a whole), new entrants, consumers. Beyond collaborations, a consensus on the value of new medicines should be agreed on. Additionally, consumer and patient health information should be leveraged to improved personalization and precision of treatments.

In one word, several changes will flow the industry and challenges will pave the way to success. But it will become much more exciting to develop drugs in this context than ever before!

Report: PWC-21st-century-pharmaceutical-collaboration-July2015

 

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