The difficult implementation of value-based healthcare – The Commonwealth Fund

ValueBasedCare

“A new survey from The Commonwealth Fund and The Kaiser Family Foundation asked primary care providers—physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants—about their experiences with and reactions to recent changes in health care delivery and payment.

Providers’ views are generally positive regarding the impact of health information technology on quality of care, but they are more divided on the increased use of medical homes and accountable care organizations.

Overall, providers are more negative about the increased reliance on quality metrics to assess their performance and about financial penalties. Many physicians expressed frustration with the speed and administrative burden of Medicaid and Medicare payments. An earlier brief focused on providers’ experiences under the ACA’s coverage expansions and their opinions about the law.”

Probably each start of a new system is painful and requires people to adapt to it. However, it will have to be carefully monitored as adoption by healthcare providers is crucial for the success of the new system. It will validate the concept of value-based healthcare.

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US healthcare coverage increased from 85 to 90% – TIME

In a little less than 4 years, US healthcare coverage increased from 85 to 90% according to a TIME article.

“Decreasing the number of uninsured is a key goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which provides Medicaid coverage to many low-income individuals in states that expand and Marketplace subsidies for individuals below 400% of the poverty line.” as stated in an article of KFF.

However, it will be difficult to have a full coverage of the population as some individuals refuse to buy healthcare insurance as they do not see how they could take advantage of the money spent in it. Some of them could simply not afford to buy coverage despite the subsidies.

Moreover, some issues arise with the methodology used to count the number of insured/uninsured people (see the Health Affairs article at the end of the post for more details).

In conclusion and despite all the issues with people not willing to adhere or counting methodology, it is a real progress to expand coverage, especially because US were lagging behind some emerging countries (have a look at the OECD Publication “Health at a Glance 2013” on page 138-139).

And what’s really interesting is the impact of more coverage on global health as a blog post pointed out.

Additional information

Estimating the Affordable Care Act’s Impact on Health – The Commonwealth Fund – August 2015

Meet the Health-Law Holdouts: Americans Who Prefer to Go Uninsured – WSJ – June 2015

Survey: America’s Uninsured Rate Is Down To 10% – And Falling – Forbes – June 2015

Counting The Uninsured: Are We Getting It Right? – Health Affairs – May 2015

Key Facts about the Uninsured Population – Kaiser Family Foundation – October 2014

Is the Affordable Care Act Working? – The New York Times – October 2014

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