E-health Day – Internet of Me: Vision and Challenges

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I had the opportunity to attend the e-health day in Sierre (TechnoArk) on June 3rd 2016. The event was well organized around big players (Boston Scientific, Roche), showing their vision of the technology and its implementation in their own business model, and startups (L.I.F.E. Corporation, Karmagenes) unveiling their innovations in the field. Moreover, other stakeholders like the health insurance Groupe Mutuel and government-financed agency CIPRET presented their real-world experiences. The event was closed by a panel discussion on the relationships between eDoctors and ePatients.

Globally, the vision of health is: health care providers will be able to improve health outcomes by working with digital patients (the data collected by sensors will be integrated and analyze to provide personalized treatments and consequently better outcomes). Several projects are developed: prosthesis control, diabetes management, vital signs monitoring for elderly people…

Below I summarize the key takeaways from the most interesting talks (not all of them).

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BOSTON SCIENTIFIC – MEDTECH : WHICH BUSINESS MODEL FOR THE E-PATIENT ?
By Frédéric Briguet, EU Digital Health Engagement

  • The goal of the presentation was to provide clues on which business model is the most appropriate for digital health companies.
  • Medical technology companies create and develop products for patients but they really have to be aware of their ecosystem and the influences that will drive patients’ behavior.
    Body sensors brought revolutionary tools to life. They are wireless, responsive, use mobile devices and allow data analysis to be performed. However, what is the real impact on health and disease management? Many companies have sensors supported by solid hardware, cloud data collection and a dashboard for mobile phone.
  • Despite the evolution of technology, we are still lacking clinical studies and proofs. In addition, the user dropout rate is pretty high (after 6 to 8 months, users abandon the sensor(s) and the app). Needless to say that, on top of all the previous disadvantages, the amount of data generated is extremely heavy and it is difficult to extract the most relevant indicators to analyze them.
    However, the first digital health products helped open new perspectives and the potential of connections between all the stakeholders. Empowering and engaging healthcare providers is also one of the key benefits of the first digital health initiatives. Beyond those elements, what’s crucial to ensure adoption and reimbursement is to demonstrate the cost savings the technology could bring to the current health care settings. Doctors also have to support it and be convinced of the use and utility for their own patients.
  • All in all, the future of healthcare is expected to improve outcomes, reduce hospital readmission rate and control costs while maintaining care access.
  • The experience of the speaker allowed him to say which business models where the most appropriate to survive and thrive in that new field. He established 4 directions (that can be combined):
    1. The patient is not a consumer. Generally speaking, he is not really willing to know that he’s ill. His main focus is to live. Family and friends are the most concerned about the patient’s health and wellbeing. Creating and developing tools that could ease the burden for the supportive people around the patient is generally well received and adopted.
    2. Understand the business ecosystem. Knowing where to position the company is fundamental to avoid being stuck in a no man’s land. Focusing on lifestyle, coaching or care pathways is different and requirements increase massively for the care pathway segment.
    3. The population is ageing and increasing. The health care system will have to support an additional financial burden with the passing of the years because we know that the majority of the costs is generated toward the end of life. Hospitals are paid today according to their own efficiency (shorter hospital stays as well as improved outcomes will generate higher payments from heath insurances). It is the OPM principle (Other People Money) meaning that the patient (who consumes) is not the payer. It is then crucial to find new solutions to reduce the costs.
    4. Understanding the disease is more than fundamental. Compliance and adherence management and control in order to avoid hospital readmissions is one of the main issues of the whole healthcare system. Beyond that point, enhancing and improving the patient’s experience as well as the quality of care could well trigger new motivations for the patient to be compliant to his treatment.
  • Go beyond sensors-mobile-cloud-dashbord to include blockchain technology, augmented reality, internet of things… + any relevant technology or innovation that can bring value to the system. This value has to be demonstrated and proved as viable for the whole system.
  • The technology has to be integrated in the patient’s experience, nearly invisible, but not less complex.

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PATIENTS LIKE ME – THE POWER OF WE
By Chris Fidyk, Business Development Director Europe

  • Accelerating research and development of new treatment but also allowing patients to support each other and exchange life experience with a disease is the main goal of PatientsLikeMe. That network is maybe the smallest social network but the larger medical registry with more than 500’000 patients. Patientslikeme provides tools for patients to put their disease into context.
  • Today, there is a lot of momentum about patient centricity. It becomes more mainstream. Patients owe other patients their own experience (drugs, symptoms,…). Empowering people to express themselves about their journey in the disease. Then, when all the stories are aggregated, meanings and trends can be extracted.
  • It is also possible to see all people taking the same drug, its perceived effectiveness as well as some conversation analytics allowing to understand which symptoms are the most talked about, the treatment awareness, the barriers to access in addition to the reasons behind their treatment failure or cessation or continuation.
  • Data (experience and discussions) stay online and available even when the patient dies to enrich other patients’ lives. Regular video postings on Patientslikeme Youtube channel show patients sharing their own experience with the website and how it helps them cope with their disease.

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ROCHE DIABETES CARE – EHEALTH: THE FUTURE WE CREATE TODAY
By Horst Merkle, Diabetes Management Solutions Director

  • You can only do something with data when you can access to it.
  • Infrastructure is the foundation for innovation and creativity” – as quoted by a speaker at the Connected Health Conference.
  • How to meet the future? The lack of healthcare staff, the increase in chronic diseases and the rising healthcare costs are the challenges. How to manage them: accountability and empowerment for the patient and the consumer. Mastering your own health with less health and care services.
  • Today, technology-driven health is messy. The solutions have to be easy to use and secure for the patient.
  • The Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHA) is at the forefront of health and wellness in today’s society, driving advancements in mobile and communications technologies, and the growing use of new devices, health trackers and apps by consumers and healthcare providers.
  • PCHA brings together the critical elements needed to ensure that these technologies are user-friendly, secure and can easily collect, display and relay personal health data. In PCHA’s vision for healthcare, consumers can use readily available technologies to access their personal health data, receive targeted health and wellness education, consult with healthcare providers and gain support from friends and family to improve their health.
  • PCHA focused on engaging consumers with their health via personalized health solutions designed for user-friendly connectivity (interoperability) that meet their lifestyle needs.
  • Business models are the main obstacles for interoperability to work.
  • Accu-Check Connect System from Roche provides an integrated meter, an app, and online tools for better diabetes management. The glucometer can share data in the cloud with the healthcare provider.

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WITHINGS – FROM QUANTIFIED SELF TO PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
By Alexis Normand, Health Development Director

  • The main goal of Withings is to sell connected products to the general public. Those products can be bought in supermarkets and will help the consumer monitor vital signs such as weight, blood pressure,… Without being a doctor, the consumer can create a dashboard for his health. Changes in health are driven by him and, due to the fact that he generates data, he will be at the center of the data collection and analysis.
  • Those tools could also be used to enhance corporate wellness and engage employees through gamification. Employers will offer a connected bracelet and will organize a competition. Employers are however inherently screening employees for health issues and can analyze aggregated data to discover trends. Data around workout and physical activity are enriched by environmental and lifestyle inputs but also by stress management and absenteeism information.
  • In the e-health field, we are in the prevention area and also on new territories like personal health dashboard and employer focus on employees’ health.
  • E-health could be widely applied together with EHRs (Electronic Health Records). Linking EHRs to outcomes allow hospitals to monitor their performance to get more money from payers as they will limit the expenses for the system as a whole.
  • Withings also builds an open health data platform with the implementation of national observatories aggregating data from all the users. Those platforms will support research on connected devices with scientific publication and could stimulate partnerships and collaborations with other data sources.

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GROUPE MUTUEL – IGNILIFE – DAILY HEALTH COACH
By Stéphane Andematten, Marketing Leader

  • Real world business case from concept to realization in partnership with the startup Ignilife.
  • Today more than 165’000 health apps are available with 40% dedicated to medical uses and 60% to wellness.
    Regarding Switzerland, few initiatives have been developed to date. Groupe Mutuel would like to be the forerunner and not a follower in the field.
  • Ignilife is a French startup with a subsidiary in Switzerland. It is the perfect combination of entrepreneurship, medical skills and user experience. Ignilife has a previous experience with Malakoff Médéric, the leader for private health insurance in France.
  • Ignilife is a e-coaching platform based on people. It covers physical and emotional wellbeing. A first auto-evaluation is performed by the user in order to have a broad overview. An assessment is then released by the system with risk factors and advices to manage and lower their impact. Support and follow-up is provided as a selection of programs the user can choose from. He can also connect his devices.
    Close to 300 video and audio plays are available. Each time a contest or challenge is won, it is input in the platform to show the progress and evolution.
  • It is essential to develop a rich, engaging and fun platform to keep the user motivated. The goals set are reasonable and not out of reach. There is a social media component where users can exchange experience and tips. More functionalities will be developed in the next future (health at work, back health, burnout prevention,…)
    Data protection is well managed, as all the data are stored in Switzerland on independent servers.
  • Groupe Mutuel pretends it does not use data collected by user but only on an aggregated basis. The rationale behind the implementation of such a project is the focus on prevention. It will help to keep health expenses at an acceptable level in the longer term.
  • Some stats:
    25’000 Ignilife users (out of more than 1’100’000 insured people)
    Mobile users connect much more than desktop users (2x)
    91% did their auto-evaluation
    61% engaged in a coaching program
    47% changed their habits

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MANAGE MY DATA OR BE MANAGED BY MY DATA
By Stéphane Koch, Expert in Digital Experience

  • People like to measure their own weight, the calories they burnt, their heart rate,…
    There is a real value added in using quantified self.
    However, coherence is not always part of the measures and can distort statistics extracted out of the data. Sensors sometimes lose connection with the app leaving gaps or errors in measures. Improving apps with coherence system would be a big step further or even allowing the user to correct the data himself.
  • Quantified self generally has a positive impact on the user’s wellbeing but it can also generate stress if the progress takes time to emerge or if it stops. Knowing the scope of the technology as well as his body are fundamental.
  • The website DMD (in French) allows the evaluation of digital tools and the sharing of everyone’s user experience.

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CIPRET – 7000 SWISS PEOPLE STOPPED SMOKING THANK TO A FACEBOOK PROGRAM
By Alexandre Dubuis, PhD, CIPRET Valais leader

  • CIPRET is a center for the prevention of tobacco use, recognized of public interest by authorities.
    It launched early 2016 a program to help people stop smoking via Facebook.
  • A real human adventure started and succeeded. The initiative was in 2 phases: recruitment and program on the same platform. It was completely free for the users. They just had to like the page, say they are interested and accept that all the posts written by CIPRET were the first they saw when they opened their Facebook app.
  • 3 pillars of the program:
    – Daily advices (personalized and not always linked to tobacco consumption)
    – Group support (tips and experience sharing)
    – Physical desire to smoke (will only last between 3 and 5 minutes => tips given to avoid relapse).
  • Professional support has been organized at 3 levels : the first one, community managers answer simple questions ; the second one, prevention experts take specific questions ; the third level, medical practioners take care of medical questions.
  • Some stats:
    1’500 posts created
    Support was on call during the whole week from 6am to 11pm
    13’000 messages have been answered in the first weeks
  • Key strengths: no moral scolding, always up-to-date, focus on workouts, nutrition, Sunday evening chats, real meeting groups.

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L.I.F.E – EXPRESS YOUR TRUTH THROUGH YOUR ACCURATE DATA
By Dario Ossola, PhD, Algorithm R&D Coordinator

  • L.I.F.E stands for Live – Inspire – Free – Entertain
  • The project started at the core of The Ark and focused on predictive models for tiredness, exhaustion and strain with the development of a garment.
    That garment is equipped with sensors to monitor vital signs (it is medically accurate and there is no need of a smartphone). It allows total freedom.
    It can be the third platform of communication (with the first 2 being computers and smartphones).
  • The medical accuracy is fundamental and it can be used in medical practice but also in sports. That garment has the same results as the invasive methods to analyze vital signs. It allows real life measurements and expansive communication (data omnipresence, diverse data analysis levels).
  • Two web sites: http://x10x.com/ (for women) and http://x10y.com/ (for men)

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ISYPEM2 – PERSONALIZATION OF TREATMENT DOAGE THANK TO MEDICAL DATABASES
By Séverine Petitprez, Scientific associate, Clinical pharmacology CHUV and Alevtina Dubovitskaya, Research assistant, HES-SO Valais

  • Software for personalized treatment dosage.
    Unique treatment dosage works very well for simple drugs like paracetamol. Unfortunately, for oncology or chronic diseases drugs, which are much more complex molecules, it doesn’t work as well. It can lead to toxicity, side effects or no effect at all.
  • Therapeutic follow-up normally starts with a blood sample, pharmacology experts interact and guide the doctor in order to personalize the treatment.
  • A new software (EzeCHieL) do exactly the same but in a much faster and more practical way. The software can create the patient’s drug metabolism curve based on the EHR (Electronic Health Record) and medical databases. Some genetic characteristics or co-morbidities can lead to changes in drug blood concentration.
  • Interoperability (web interface) as well as confidentiality and data security are guaranteed (pseudonymisation, anonymisation).

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KARMAGENES – BE A GAME CHANGER MEET YOURSELF
By Kyriakos Kokkoris, CEO

  • Karmagenes is a game combining gene profiling and psychological analysis. Integrating genetics with psychology for improved personal development.
  • What defines who you are: what you are (DNA) and where you live (environment & perception).
  • Genetics meet psychology.
  • Human centric approach
  • Could be a network of personalities and connect locally.
  • Personal guide for career development, personal motivation, and physical as well as emotional well-being.

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PANEL DISCUSSION – E-DOCTORS AND E-PATIENTS, AN EMERGING RELATIONSHIP
Moderated by Sébastien Mabillard, Swiss Digital Health coordinator with 5 paticipants: Dr. Jean-Gabriel Jeannot; Dr. Pietro Scalfaro; Pierre-Mikael Legris; Christine Bienvenu; David-Zacharie Issom.

  • The market is not yet mature, a lot of opportunities are waiting to be seized.
    The patient is at the center of all motivations.
  • Despite new technologies, there is a lot to do to reach the patient. Few success stories (the CIPRET is however an excellent example).
  • What about doctors’ digital education? Patients are really driving the trend today; they stimulate doctors to be up to date and they push technology adoption.
    Patients are very often looking for information online. Doctors should be prepared and help patients to use the right web sites in order to find appropriate and correct information. Doctors should also contribute and provide content on website to populate them with correct information.
  • All that information help to start interesting conversations. Information exchange should also be facilitated. The patient could be educated to provide the appropriate amount of information to avoid overload.
  • Patient should take part and be part of medical research. The patient is the least used resource in health care. With patients’ associations, precious information is stored and exchanged. That data can be analyzed.
  • The social component is extremely important for patients. Several of them like to share their experience and find support online. They also feel useful to provide information for other that have been diagnosed recently.
  • By giving access to medical and health information, communication and interactions with doctors will be easier and improved.

The potential for disruption in healthcare by Apple

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A lot has been said about the role of Apple in healthcare, the disruption it could bring and the need for it. If Steve Jobs was alive today, he would surely help the healthcare industry improve.

There is a lot of work and some progress are currently being made but they are slow to implement because evolution is not always seen as such (we all know about the learning curve…).

Apple is not the only company that could bring change and improvements, even disruption, in healthcare. All the technology companies are interested in this field and they will inevitably contribute to change the landscape.

What could Apple bring?

Analyze and integrate health data

The introduction of HealthKit in June 2014 was the start of a big wave of healthcare initiatives launched by Apple. Data collected via the HealthKit through wearables like the Apple Watch can be shared with the user’s doctor in order to improve the doctor-patient relationship. Data can then be integrated in the EHRs (Electronic Health Records) of the patient in order to enlarge the data collection.

Beyond data collection stands data analysis and it’s done with the help of the partnership with IBM Watson to support this effort.

Improve EHRs and real-time medical data to broaden prevention initiatives

Merging EHR and real-time data could enable the use of predictive analytics to anticipate health issues and diseases spread.

The implementation of EHRs could simplify and quicken the collection, use and consultation of medical data, especially in the case of emergencies. This could dramatically help to avoid medical errors due to the lack of specific retrospective information.

Partnerships

Apple has been and is still extremely smart in building strategic partnerships. 3 main partners worth keeping in mind:

  • IBM Watson: storage and analysis of raw data on IBM Watson Health Cloud for the data collected on HealthKit and ResearchKit.
  • Mayo Clinic: access to over 1 million patients in several countries around the world using dedicated proprietary EHR and communication tools for doctor-patient interactions.
  • Epic Systems: expertise in EHR covering over 100m people in USA.

HealthKit & ResearchKit

The main goal of the HealthKit is to collect data from wearables and other connected devices to better monitor individual health. HealthKit also allows the integration of 3rd party apps and devices.

ResearchKit is an add-on to the HealthKit as it helps create apps to improve clinical trials and medical studies.

Apple Watch v. 2.0 and new wearables

The new versions of the Apple Watch could potentially be developed into more sophisticated health-tracking devices with improved heart rate monitor. Moreover, thank to non-invasive technologies, new vital signs could to be captured and analyzed more accurately.

 

Related sources:

Why healthcare needs a Steve Jobs-like disruptor, STAT, February 2016.

Three More Industries Apple Could Disrupt, re/code, July 2015.

Steve Jobs didn’t disrupt, he adapted. So should healthcare, Becker’s Hospital Review, July 2014.

The Industries Apple Could Disrupt Next, Harvard Business Review, June 2014.

 

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Alphabet (ex-Google) is the next big thing in Life sciences

A lot is currently written about the initiatives launched by Alphabet (Google) in the life sciences field.

I had the wonderful opportunity to have a look at the report written by the internet analyst, John Blackledge, from Cowen and I must say that he’s very smart at showing the huge potential of the life sciences at the core of Alphabet (Google).

This report is amazing as it allows you to have a better understanding of what’s happening now inside Alphabet (Google). I summarized the key points/quotes from the report below and I added other articles at the end of this blog post. Moreover, I will update it frequently as the news come in. This is a fascinating topic, I really hope Alphabet (Google) would be able to replicate the same success it has built with its search engine.

Key quotes & comments from the report:

  • Expansion into health care and related segments allows Google to leverage its core competencies in Internet communications technology, data structuring and analysis, and fundamental process reinvention.

 

  • Specific areas of focus in healthcare include:
    (1) the sequencing the human genome and the rise of precision medicine: despite the monumental significance of mapping the human genome and the implications for drug discovery, this was but one step in a long journey that continues to this day. Moreover, genes are but one factor in disease, and little is known about what role environment and lifestyle play.
    (2) the digitization of health data is exploding, with a virtually endless list of sources that can offer insight into clinical data, drug studies and more. As more data is digitized, there will be a profound impact on how patient care is administered, how therapies are researched, and how drugs are tested. EHRs (Electronic Health Records) are crucial but implementation is very challenging. Harmonization and data aggregation need to find their way. Wearables are another interesting topic in the digitization of health data. Social media and discussion boards as well as patients website are essential parts of the system that must be closely monitored as more and more patients use those communication channels in order to provide feedback and comments on treatments and daily struggles with healthcare providers.
    (3) the shift to value-based care, where payments are based on the value of care, is driving a change in how services are delivered and how much consumers engage in the process. From a provider perspective, doctors are incentivized to manage patients to the best possible health outcome at the lowest cost. From a patient perspective,
    consumers are being empowered to take a more active role in their own health care.
    These health care trends are being accommodated by technology advances in areas such as social, mobile, analytics and cloud computing, all areas of Google expertise.

 

  • Alphabet invests in health in five different ways:
    (1) Google Life Sciences originated in Google[x], a research lab within Google that was funded by the company’s board of directors in January 2010 to pursue “moonshots”—audacious new projects that have a low probability of succeeding, but could be truly revolutionary if they do. The company views moonshots as critical in driving the true innovation required to affect revolutionary change and avoid the “incrementalism” or evolutionary change that tends to lead to corporate irrelevance over time. The Life Sciences team is responsible for such innovations as glucose monitoring smart contact lenses. With an expanding list of intellectual property, Life Sciences has begun to accelerate its collaborative efforts with third parties. The company is aggressively partnering with leading players in the health care space on a growing number of programs.
    (2) Calico’s mission is to harness advanced technologies to increase understanding of the biology that controls lifespan. Calico was originally conceived by Google Ventures President and General Partner, Bill Maris, who observed that most companies seek to find treatments for disease and associated symptoms, but that none address the root cause of disease and death. He wondered if studying the impact of aging on genetic material could lead to the discovery of drugs that could address many age-related diseases and significantly extend the human life span.
    (3) Google Ventures has provided seed, venture and growth stage funding to a host of companies in diverse fields, but its stated focus is machine learning and life science investing.
    (4) Google Capital was formed to invest in later-stage technology companies with a focus on emerging technology leaders and potential disruptors. Unlike the earlier stage companies in Google’s other investment vehicles, the later stage companies in Google Capital tend to be fairly common household names. Although the stated focus of Google Capital is on technology companies, the collision of technology and health care is blurring the lines of what a traditional “technology” company looks like.
    (5) Google Core: Over time, Google has invested in numerous health-related initiatives within its main corporate division. These have tended to be very closely linked to the company’s core businesses, such as Search. Earlier this year, the company announced that it will add health information that has been fact-checked by physicians directly to search results. The company is also talking to the FDA about using search query data to identify adverse drug reactions.

 

  • Google’s Health-Related Focus Areas: regardless of where they are housed within Google’s corporate structure, most of Google’s health-related endeavors share common characteristics.
    (1) Longevity
    (2) Genetics and Chronic Care
    (3) Diagnostics
    (4) Diabetes/Digital Health
    (5) Medical Devices
    (6) Telehealth/Digital Health
    (7) Wearables/Fitness

 

  • Google’s health endeavors fit with the company’s goals of “making the world’s information useful” and helping millions of people. Indeed, Google believes that many of the same principles, techniques and problem solving capabilities employed by its software developers can be applied to the massive inefficiencies that exist in health care to create transformational solutions and medical breakthroughs that help people live longer, healthier lives. Health care ambitions can be summarized as:
    (1) Analyze: Analytics to inform decision-making and provide business insight
    (2) Attract: Attract health care constituents to platforms and solutions that drive engagement
    (3) Aggregate: Aggregate data from disparate sources onto the Internet or GCP

 

Additional resources:

Alphabet to help researchers predict disease – Financial Times – April 2017

Google Life Sciences Exodus – STAT – March 2016

Verily, Google’s Health Gambit, Is Stacked With Scientists. Now It Needs to Build a Business – ReCode – December 2015

Google hires mental health expert to lead new life sciences unit – Financial Times – September 2015 (Subscription required)

Head of Mental Health Institute Leaving for Google Life Sciences – The New York Times – September 2015

Google Bets on Insurance Startup Oscar Health – WSJ – September 2015

Is Health Care Google’s Next Big Business After Search? This Investment Bank Thinks So – Re/Code – September 2015

Why Google Is Going All In On Diabetes – NPR – September 2015

Google’s health startup, AbbVie team up on drug research – Chicago-Sun Times – September 2015

Google Life Sciences Company Has New Deal, Official Nemesis in Diabetes – Re/Code – August 2015

Alphabet Breathes New Life, Resources Into Google’s Health Care Projects – iHealthBeat – August 2015

Google Health – Easy as ABC. Alphabet, Calico and the Aging of Humanity – What on Earth are they doing? – Digital Intervention – August 2015

 

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Google Willingness to Help Life Sciences – Wired

Google, or Alphabet, wants biomedical research and life sciences to be more than just side projects.

Several years ago, its efforts under way in that field were probably not considered seriously by the industrial stakeholders like Big Pharma and biotech companies.

Today it is different after several investments commited lately.

Discover more in the Wired article

 

Additional Resources

4 of the biggest healthcare challenges Google is tackling – HealthcareDIVE – August 2015

Here’s why Google Ventures invests so much money in life-science companies – Business Insider – May 2015

Andrew Conrad – Google Life Sciences – The 25 most influential people in biopharma in 2015 – FierceBiotech – May 2015

Google Continues To Build Upon Its Life Sciences Ecosystem – Forbes – September 2014

Meet the Google X Life Sciences Team – WSJ – July 2014

 

 

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MicroHealth Helps Patients Manage Chronic Illnesses

We know that chronic diseases account for the majority of health expenditures. Helping patients with digital tools improving the management of their condition is a great step forward!

10 thoughts from 5 great healthcare minds – Becker’s Hospital Review

5 important people gave their thoughts about our current healthcare system in this Becker’s Hospital Review article:

– Jonathan Bush, founder and CEO of athenahealth (Watertown, Mass.)

– Malcolm Gladwell, journalist and best-selling author

– Chuck Lauer, former publisher of Modern Healthcare, and author, public speaker and career coach

– Nancy Schlichting, CEO of Henry Ford Health System (Detroit)

– John Halamka, MD, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston)

My favorite thoughts in a nutshell:

– On healthcare’s sustainability: new infrastructure is essential. Obsolete systems are a burden and a brake when it comes to innovation and efficiency.

– On changing the practice of medicine: doctors will have to consider the patient as a whole and spend time taking care of all the aspects of his/her health.

– On high-price medicine: prices should be linked with the innovation the product brings to the patient and the other stakeholders including the health system.

– On sharing healthcare data: data sharing with the goal of improving the life of each patient by learning and analytics could be a game-changer in the next future.

All these quotes could inspire leadership styles and help us create, implement and deliver better care for the patients in need.

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With Big Data & Digital Health – New Collaborations are Emerging in the Pharma Industry – PWC

TeamWork

A newly published report by PWC reveals novel collaboration models for improved value of medicines

“Driven by empowered consumers and connected technology, the New Health Economy is shifting business incentives from volume to value with a focus on health outcomes beyond the clinic.”

Big data together with EHR (electronic health records) and wearables drive patient empowerment. Today, more and more, people have their say in treatment choices. Actually, health benefits and prices are crucial criteria for decision, especially as patients face today higher out-of-pocket expenses than ever before. We all well know that expensive treatments are financially disastrous for patients as mentioned in one of my previous posts.

Currently, increased focus is put on drug cost effectiveness as we switch progressively from a fee-for-service to an outcome-based world. Every treatment should be precisely calculated in order to be sure that it is optimized for all stakeholders from all points of view. In this context, already last year, PWC highlighted the beginning of a new system: the New Health Economy, where outcomes and quality are rewarded (instead of volume). It is the continuum of what has been started by Michael E. Porter several years ago.

All these changes have essential meanings. Therefore business models need to adapt to current trends: digital is unavoidable; purchaser perspective is necessary; patients need to become partners; regulatory changes have to be anticipated.

Adapting business models is fantastic but not sufficient. Novel collaborations are needed to optimize them for long-term success. All the stakeholders have to be integrated and blended by the biopharma companies: government agencies, insurers (payers as a whole), new entrants, consumers. Beyond collaborations, a consensus on the value of new medicines should be agreed on. Additionally, consumer and patient health information should be leveraged to improved personalization and precision of treatments.

In one word, several changes will flow the industry and challenges will pave the way to success. But it will become much more exciting to develop drugs in this context than ever before!

Report: PWC-21st-century-pharmaceutical-collaboration-July2015

 

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Digital Health Expected to Save US Healthcare System > $100 Billion Over Next 4 Years – Accenture

A new survey done by Accenture showed that Digital Health could have a huge impact on healthcare costs, especially in the US

A wonderful infographic has been designed to show the key points from the study (see below). There is no need to say more about it.

The link to the article.

 

Additional material:

2015 Global health care Outlook – 2015 – Deloitte

The future of healthcare—there’s an app for that – 2012 – Bain & Company

The digital dimension of healthcare – 2012 – Global Health Policy Summit Working Group

 

Accenture-Colossal-Clash-Infographic

Scientists want to make sure medical breakthroughs aren’t just for white men

Precision medicine could reduce the gender gap in clinical trials and genetic databases. This will lead to better care and improved outcomes for women and minorities.

Medtronic – The Digital Pancreas – The Future of Diabetes Management? – Fierce Medical Devices

pancreas

A truly interesting article of the transformation of Medtronic Diabetes business

2015 could be a year to remember as the start of a new era in improved diabetes management thank to digital tools.

Diabetes management at Medtronic & deals history

It started several years ago but back in May 2001, a transforming event took place: Medtronic bought Minimed as well as an affiliated company for USD 3.8 billion. Looking only at Minimed, Medtronic paid USD 3.28 billion for USD 400 million in sales (8.2x 2001 sales). Despite its price, quoted as high by some investors and analysts at that time, the deal rationale was pretty compelling as it allowed Medtronic to enter the diabetes management arena. MiniMed offered a beachhead into the field of technological management of diabetes, one of the fastest-growing chronic diseases in the world and one that affects an estimated several millions of people. The devices produced by MiniMed help patients manage their insulin needs and monitor glucose levels.

Since 2001, several deals and partnerships paved the way up to where Medtronic is today. After having a look at my deals database, I can say that some of them clearly stand out:

November 2004: agreement with Novo Nordisk on prefilled insulin cartridges;

– August 2007: co-promotion & co-marketing with Lifescan and Bayer of blood glucose meters (in USA together with Lifescan and outside USA with Bayer extended in 2011). These devices had wireless data transmission to insulin pums;

May 2009: strategic marketing collaboration with Eli Lilly on patient education and disease management;

June 2009: acquisition of PreciSense, a medical device company developing CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) technology. A step forward for “closed loop” systems dedicated to insulin delivery;

January 2013: research collaboration with GI Dynamics on EndoBarrier;

August 2013: acquisition of Cardiocom, a developer and provider of integrated telehealth and patient services for the management of chronic diseases;

June 2014: global strategic alliance with Sanofi, aimed at improving patient experience and outcomes for people with diabetes around the world. The priority is the development of drug-device combinations and delivery of care management services to improve adherence as well as simplify insulin treatment.

Medtronic has built its Diabetes franchise over the last several years and is still fully committed to be the leader in this field. This pledge could lead to the achievement of the digital pancreas, a fully autonomous device (closed loop system) monitoring blood glucose continuously and adjusting insulin doses as perfectly as the biological pancreas without human interaction. Some researchers already have prototypes, studies are ongoing, universities and hospitals are teaming up. The field is really at its boiling point!

Deals and partnerships in 2015

In this FierceMedicalDevices article, we can see Medtronic advancing its franchise by investing with determination and dedication in new technologies.

Many partnerships have been signed in 2015: Diabeter (a diabetes clinic and research center dedicated to providing comprehensive and individualized care for children and young adults with diabetes), DreaMed (artificial pancreas technology for integration into future Medtronic insulin pumps). Beyond healthcare companies, Medtronic is also expanding its network into consumer electronics with Samsung (integration of mobile and wearable devices to improve disease management with an Android mobile app) and diabetes data with a startup called Glooko. It also partnered with IBM Watson Health for next-generation disease management solutions.

All these deals are clearly accelerating innovation at Medtronic but in a patient-centric fashion as in every deal we can see the benefits for them and the management of their disease. What could be the next step? A deal with Apple in order to nearly fully cover all the mobile OS in the world.

For my conclusion I will quote Medtronic CFO, Gary Ellis: “We’re focused on transforming our diabetes group from a market-leading pump and sensor company into a holistic diabetes management company focused on making a real difference in outcomes and costs,” summed up Medtronic CFO Gary Ellis on the most recent quarterly conference call.

 

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Hacking the Human OS – IEEE

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A mind-blowing report from IEEE about the human body’s operating system

Can we harvest digital health data from trackers and sensors to improve our health and well-being? I summarized below what you will find on the IEEE dedicated web page. I was amazed by the variety and depth of all the innovations presented in these pages. Some of them have certainly the power to be game changers in the health care world. I’m looking forward to seeing all the advances coming to life!

Reading the Code

Several technologies are close to the market and will help us monitor our health. A very good example is the biostamps developed by John Rogers from the University of Illinois. These tiny, stretchable and skin-like sensors are able to send information and data to our smartphone alerting us whether something is happening in our body. More and more complex data could be sensed such as blood oxygen, blood glucose and even muscle weakness or sleep patterns.

Another fascinating example that could change the life of Type 1 diabetes patients is the artificial pancreas. It links “data from an implanted blood-sugar sensor to a computer, which then controls how a pump worn on the hip dribbles insulin under the skin through a pipette. In its fully realized form, the machine would take the patient out of the decision-making loop”. Advanced versions of the system are currently in clinical trials. Continuous monitoring is a huge advance in the field of disease management. It could strongly lighten the daily burden of each patient.

Another field where wearable are very popular: athletes. They are always eager to test the last innovation in the wearables arena. Physiological measurements can be extremely useful to optimize training and rest periods, improve performance and avoid injuries. Sleeves, wristbands, sensors equipped with highest technology can really make a difference in the way we monitor and track performance.

A device rapidly diagnosing any medical condition or disorder… Sounds like science fiction, right? Like in Star Trek… Some of you may recall the tricorder. And guess what? It’s about to become reality thank to a competition launched by Qualcomm. 300 teams registered, 10 finalists which are about to deliver their prototypes very soon. Once the winner has been chosen, real life clinical trials will start and we will know if it’s really working as expected. It’s a huge step forward as it will allow the diagnosis (and maybe the start of a treatment) for a lot of people, not only in US or Europe but also in emerging countries where the lack of medical infrastructure is killing human beings…

 

Analyzing the Code

Technology companies showed their interest in healthcare only recently… It’s welcomed because without technology you cannot do anything with data sets. However, some people are afraid of their data becoming public and being hacked. I think that between these two extreme opinions, we can take the good from both sides and see what this can bring us. “Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Samsung, have all launched e-health initiatives, mostly based around smartphones and wearables. Indeed, the fast-growing health care business would seem a natural next step for the tech giants”. A lot of deals have been signed between pharmaceutical companies and technology firms: Google and Novartis; IBM, Apple, Medtronic & JNJ… These are deals to follow in order to analyze the outcomes. Great initiatives could really emerge and I think we are at the beginning of a new era!

Long term analysis could help us understand in a more detailed way how we get sick, how the disease develop and how we could have anticipated it by looking at biomarkers trends.

The new era of precision medicine is making a big difference for patients. An open-source platform has transformed the way patients are being treated. Surgery is not always the best option in oncology for example and sometimes drug treatment is much more effective. A thorough and careful analysis of all the parameters will help doctors taking the right decision for the right patient at the right time.

Real-time epidemics modelling could have saved lives. Building treatment centers at the right locations, anticipating the spread of the disease (in this case, Ebola) and how to limit the contagion were several of the criteria used to run the model. We will never know what would have happen without such a model but globally we can say that modelling is critical in disease management. Additionally, it is not the use of a single model that will be helpful but the customized and accurate modelling for each and every epidemic, according to its characteristics.

 

Changing the Code

Performing surgical interventions at very small scales is becoming a reality. “Thanks to developments in microfabrication and other areas, researchers are pushing the limits on the size and capabilities of objects small enough to move through the human body”. “With the right design, researchers say, a microrobot—or a swarm of them—could deliver a highly targeted dose of drugs or radioactive seeds, clear a blood clot, perform a tissue biopsy, or even build a scaffold on which new cells could grow”. For the time being, tests have only been run in animals.

A new emerging medical field: electrical therapy. Vagus nerve stimulation has the potential to treat several conditions from migraine to asthma, even immune diseases. Progress is very slow and several failures have made history… but new startups are created and renew the interest in this type of technology.

W like Watson, the digital MD. Watson is based on machine learning: “bringing together computer scientists and clinicians to assemble a reference database, enter case studies, and ask thousands of questions. When the program makes mistakes, it self-adjusts. Researchers also evaluate the answers and manually tweak Watson’s underlying algorithms to generate better output. Here there’s a gulf between medicine as something that can be extrapolated in a straightforward manner from textbooks, journal articles, and clinical guidelines, and the much more complicated challenge of also codifying how a good doctor thinks.” Progress is under way.

 

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8 emerging technologies that could revolutionize the life sciences – Medium

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Google Ventures managing partner’s fascinating view on the next wave of innovations in life sciences

Bill Marris is a key influencer to follow in the life sciences industry, but only on Google+… On Twitter, it’s better to follow Google Ventures. Anyway… There is no need to present him.

He is a visionary for new technologies, new business models and he’s very smart when it comes to spot the next breakthrough innovation in life sciences. In this context, he wrote a captivating article on the 8 emerging technologies that could revolutionize the life sciences.

I propose a summary below but I agree it is a pure pleasure to read the entire article, so do it!

Many of the technologies that will transform healthcare already exist but have not yet been expoited at their full potential. Here is the list:

1. Artificial intelligence in healthcare – Machine learning and computer power will help drive better diagnosis and improved data analysis in order to support medical decision-making.

2. Understanding the brain – Decoding the brain is the key to find a cure for brain diseases as well as spinal cord injuries. With recent discoveries, we are at the start of a new era! Check here too!

3. Reinventing antibiotics – Widespread use as well as misuse are at the origins of the emergence of resistant bacteria. We have to really focus on this emerging threat by limiting the use of antibiotics and promoting research of new molecules. Have a look here for more!

4. Battling cancer – Amazing progress has been done over the last years and it is not finished yet! There is more to come. Additionally a real innovation will also be to make these treatments affordable for every patient.

5. Genetic repair – CRISPR, the gene-editing technique, allows the replacement and/or repair of any genetic mutation. Wow!

6. Understanding the microbiome – The 2.5kg of bacteria living on us are a treasure trove! The microbiome is an organ in itself, responsible for our health and wellbeing as well as our diseases and bad moods…

7. Organ generation – 3D cell culture and 3D bioprinting could be the solution to our ageing bodies… Spare parts…!

8. Stem cells – How to maintain the regenerative power of stem cells into adulthood?

All these fields are promising and could give hope to thousands of people in the world. More technology into healthcare for increased value is unavoidable. Let’s hope health and quality of life won’t become unaffordable.

 

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Defining Digital Medicine – Nature Biotechnology

Notes from the AppsWorld Europe 2013 panel "The Internet of Things Revolution - Functional, Usable, Wearable" with Tamara Roukaerts, Saverio Romeo, Paul Lee, Ben Moir and Mike Barlow.

Notes from the AppsWorld Europe 2013 panel “The Internet of Things Revolution – Functional, Usable, Wearable” with Tamara Roukaerts, Saverio Romeo, Paul Lee, Ben Moir and Mike Barlow.

Healthcare transformation ahead

In this excellent article from Nature Biotechnology written by people at PureTech, we have the chance to get an overview of this new exciting field: Digital Medicine.

This convergence of technology and health will lead to several transformations: disease management, research, clinical trials, medical practice,… A new era is beginning!

However, opportunities are doubled by challenges. We need to tackle the lasts to profit from the firsts.

Definition

Why do we use digital medicine instead of digital health? According to the authors, digital health is too broad as it also includes apps and products not medically validated but simply focused to enhance people’s wellness and wellbeing.

Digital medicine is defined by “technology and products that are undergoing rigorous clinical validation and/or that ultimately will have a direct impact on diagnosing, preventing, monitoring or treating a disease, condition or syndrome.” (quote from the article p. 457)

Digital medicine themes

1. Continuous and remote monitoring. A tool to detect disease earlier leading to lower healthcare costs.

2. Digital phenotype. A additional layer of information enabling the construction of more accurate disease models in order to better understand them.

3. Remote disease management. Chronic disease management will be nearly effortless and the lack of data gap will allow doctors to improve their medical follow-up of patients.

4. The connected patient. The empowered patient. The engaged and sharing patient. Communities of patients.

5. Interpreting the data torrent. The challenge of integrating large and heterogenous datasets could be solved one day with powerful algorithms and machine Learning.

6. Security and privacy. The obtention of the patient’s consent is crucial and should be much simpler than today.

7. Opportunities and challenges. Increased scientific evidence but reimbursement issues, new field of research based on wearables, changes to patient-doctor interactions, integration of patient-specific data by the doctor.

Conclusion

Digital medicine is unavoidable and doctors will have to integrate this trend in order to optimize their relationships with their patients by empowering them and maintaining a two-way discussion toward a unique goal: better patient outcomes.

Nature Biotechnology Article (free)

More on Digital Medicine

Have a look at my posts on this topic.

Why Digital Health Has Not (Yet) Transformed Pharmaceutical Drug Development – 2015 – Forbes

Rock Health Founder On The Future Of Digital Medicine – 2015 – TechCrunch (Video)

Top 20 Technologies that Will Change our Lives: Next Up – Digital Medicine – 2014 – Forbes

How Digital Medicine Will Soon Save Your Life – 2014 – WSJ

Medicine goes digital – 2009 – The Economist

Digital Medicine – Implication for Healthcare Leaders – 2003 – Healthfutures.net (a nice document from 2003, projecting the reader in 2013… with futuristic visions sometimes…)

What is digital medicine? – 2002 – D. W. Shaffer (the first article on the subject)

 

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Blood: Underappreciated Resource in the Health/Disease? – The Next Element

Bloodanalysis

Very well written and insightful post about the use of blood in medicine. Worth a look!

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The Next Element

Alternative title: Pitching a VC on Disruption of Blood Testing

You may have seen some recent editorials about the necessary frequency of blood tests for healthy individuals, many of them prompted by a series of tweets from Mark Cuban:

MarkCubanTwitter BloodTests

Although there are certainly potential dangers in expecting any and all test results to be immediately informative and/or actionable, there are benefits in disrupting the status quo of how and when we collect information. A potential parallel is the “wearables” market, which has seeped from the “enthusiasts” (so-called quantified self-ers) to being used in trials of new drugs as well as disease research.

Blood Testing: Cost

One significant area of potential benefit to increased attention is cost. Generally when your physician prescribes a drug, you are asked what pharmacy to send the prescription. When told to get blood tests or imaging services, patients (in my experience) are sent to the affiliated…

View original post 1,446 more words

IBM strikes digital health deal with Apple, Medtronic and J&J – Financial Times

AppleWatchHealth data tracking and sharing is a reality

IBM teams up with Apple and other key health players to be in one of the hottest life sciences fields today: digital health. For more on this topic, check the dedicated category of my blog.

Using Apple’s HealthKit Platform, together with IBM app, will allow users to track their heart rate, calories burnt and cholesterol levels (and maybe much more data in the next future). The next step, if users are willing to do it, is to share these data with medical researchers, doctors and, why not, insurance companies (like in this NYT article). This emerging trend is called Data Philanthropy.

The current trend is now to have deeper ties between the life sciences and tech/IT fields.

It is fascinating to study health data trends from craddle to grave but the biggest challenge is to organize available data and electronic health records in order to better care for the patients and improve health outcomes without increasing costs.

IBM is fully committed as it also indicated it will commercialize dedicated tools for medical researchers, doctors and insurance companies with two goals in mind: support clinical trials (enrollment, data collection & analysis) AND contain healthcare costs. IBM already has a big data computing system named Watson, able to query this huge amount of data and spot trends.

The average patient will collect a terabyte of medical data in their lifetime. Our analytics will be able to find the dots, the clues that are eluding us, and find new breakthroughs,” said Michael Rhodin, senior vice-president of IBM Watson.

The two other deals done with J&J and Medtronic are showing the real life impact of digital health:

J&J has asked IBM to build a “coaching system” to ensure patients are fit enough to undergo spinal surgery or joint replacement, and to encourage them to do the right exercises after their operation.

– IBM is also working with Medtronic on a smart diabetes treatment system that would take readings from a patient’s glucose monitor and ensure their insulin pump dispenses the precise amount of drug required.

FT Article    Data For Health Report    38 Health Apps

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How medical technology can be hacked? – Wired

Drug Pump’s Security Flaws Lets Hackers Raise Dose Limits

hackerHealth data hacked, hospital system bugged… A lot of news are emerging every day about breaches into the safety and security of electronic medical devices.

In this article written by Kim Zetter in Wired, it is explained that drug infusion pumps could be controlled by anybody anywhere. “Hospira systems don’t use authentication for their internal drug libraries, which help set upper and lower boundaries for the dosages of various intravenous drugs that a pump can safely administer. As a result, anyone on the hospital’s network—including a patient in the hospital or a hacker accessing the pumps over the internet—can load a new drug library to the pumps that alters the limits, thereby potentially allowing the delivery of a deadly dosage.”

Awareness should be raised inside and outside the hospital but, more importantly, in the medical technology industry. They should hire experts in security as well as former hackers to make their devices safe enough to be used in any setting worldwide.

Wired Article

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