Not Vaccinating Children Is the Greater Risk – The New York Times

This New York Times article takes a step back on childhood immunizations and gives us an overview of the diseases and complications that could be avoided with vaccines.

As most of us already know, vaccines are probably one of the most important health and lifesaving advances of the last century. However, misinformation and scaremongering is damaging the perception and the adoption of that innovation.

When too many people opt out of immunizing, outbreaks of preventable diseases happen, with sometimes deadly consequences for some.

Childhood diseases could lead to serious complications doubled by debilitating infections.

It’s a shame not to use all the available technology to protect us and our loved ones from potentially deadly diseases. It’s like riding a motorbike without helmet.

Who would do it today?

Additional resources

History of Vaccines

Understanding Vaccines – Public Health

Vaccines & Immunizations – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Vaccines.gov – US Government

Vaccines & Autism – Science-Based Medicine

Australia takes a stand against anti-vaxxers with a proposed $11,000 penalty – Quartz – September 2015

732,000: American Lives Saved by Vaccination – The New York Times – September 2015

U.S. vaccination rates high, but pockets of unvaccinated pose risk – Reuters – August 2015

Here’s How the Anti-Vaxxers’ Strongest Argument Falls Apart – TIME – August 2015

Vaccine hesitancy: A growing challenge for immunization programmes – WHO – August 2015

How This South Dakota Nurse Convinced A Religious Community To Vaccinate – Huffpost – August 2015

Vaccine Safety: Examine the Evidence – American Academy of Pediatrics – April 2013

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What if we prescribed video games, and not Ritalin, to treat ADHD? – Medium

gamers

How digital games can inspire and motivate children — and result in better learning outcomes

An extremely interesting article on gaming and its impact on children learning skills will maybe lead to the prescription of game sessions in the treatment of psychological ailments.

We are entering in an emerging field called therapeutic neurogaming.

“It’s built on two basic ideas: First, that the brain is “plastic” for far longer than scientists once believed, so healing can be achieved in schoolchildren of all ages without drugs, through basic neurofeedback therapy. Second, that therapy doesn’t just happen — it requires work and patience and a regular dose of practice.” (Quote from Medium Article)

I’m a strong believer that games will be fully part of our lives and not only part of our hobbies in the near future.

Three years ago I read a book written by Jane McGonigal, an expert in gaming and gamification: Reality is broken. I have only one word: brilliant. She walks you through the gaming universe explaining you all the type of games and how they can be used to improve life, well-being, relationships,… She is about to publish another book in September 2015: SuperBetter: A Revolutionary Approach to Getting Stronger, Happier, Braver and More Resilient–Powered by the Science of Games. I’m really looking forward to it.

It is a real trend we have to count on. The nice fact: it is not a boring trend… it is fun!! and there is probably more to come!!

Medium Article

More on the benefits of gaming:

The Game Believes in You: How Digital Play Can Make Our Kids Smarter – 2015 – Greg Toppo

Cognitive Benefits of Playing Video Games – 2015 – Psychology Today

The Benefits of Playing Video Games – 2014 – American Psychologist

The DeanBeat: Neurogaming is a nascent market fueled by brain games and sensors – 2013 – Venture Beat

Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World – 2011 – Jane McGonigal + her TED Talk

Gamification to improve our world – 2011 – Yu Kai Chu – TEDxLausanne

Companies or Institutions developing therapeutic neurogaming:

Gazzaley Lab (Neuroracer)

Akili Interactive Lab (Project: EVO)

PlayNice Institute (MindLight)

PuzzleBox (Orbit Helicopter)

Emotiv (EEG for game control)

 

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Emotions are driving our physical health – 2 TED Talks

Beautiful examples of our mental wellbeing affecting our health

The first talk from Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime. It is inspiring and providing us with a better understanding about the real impact of childhood trauma and toxic stress on children’s health.

She is a pediatrician raising awareness about childhood trauma and its impact on global health. “In high doses, it affects brain development, the immune system, hormonal systems, and even the way our DNA is read and transcribed.”

How to measure it and how to see the impact all life long? It has been done by the ACE Study. Two conclusions from this study: 1. childhood trauma is common and 2. the more trauma you suffered from, the more at risk you are to develop COPD, cancer, depression, heart disease… “We now understand better than we ever have before how exposure to early adversity affects the developing brains and bodies of children.”

She created the Center for Youth Wellness to prevent, screen and heal the impacts of toxic stress.

Adverse Childhood Experiences Study    Center for Youth Wellness

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The second talk from Guy Winch: Why we all need to practice emotional first aid. Taking care of our emotions and our minds is crucial for our global health.

His talk is full of hints to live better like: “By taking action when you’re lonely, by changing your responses to failure, by protecting your self-esteem, by battling negative thinking, you won’t just heal your psychological wounds, you will build emotional resilience, you will thrive.”

This talk showed us why it is necessary to be conscious about our emotional health and why we need to take care of it. If we don’t, it can have devastating effects and even lead to premature death. We need to teach these tips to children to help them cope better with failure, rejection, lack of conviction and rumination.

Guy Winch Book

Tougher laws a likely legacy of the Disneyland measles outbreak – Reuters

One undeniable fact: Most of the recent measles cases have been in people not vaccinated

child_in_a_raincoatThe proposed laws have been introduced in statehouses by both Democrats and Republicans and include a range of approaches, from requiring schools to post immunization rates to entirely eliminating religious and philosophical exemptions.

The year’s largest measles outbreak has been traced to Disneyland in Anaheim, California where visitors were exposed to the disease in mid-December. The vast majority of cases have been in that state, which allows both philosophical and religious exemptions.

In all, 10 of the 17 states with reported measles cases have allowed parents to opt out of vaccines on philosophical grounds, creating a far easier way out of immunizations than states that only exempt families with extensively documented religious objections or health conditions that preclude vaccinations. Read more  What is measle?